A Look At Reflexology

Wolverhampton Reflexologist, Reflexology Tutor and Practictioner Lynne Hancher

what is reflexology?  how does reflexology work?  history of reflexology  uses of reflexology treatment  side affects  costs  faqs

Wolverhampton Reflexologist

My name is Lynne Hancher and I practice reflexology in Wolverhampton. As an accredited member of the Association of Reflexologists I also offer Reflexology Training Courses (and can offer one to one tuition by arrangement).

Below I have assembled some information on reflexology and its uses which I hope you find useful:

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What is Reflexology?

Reflexology (inc. VRT - see later) is a complementary therapy that treats the whole of the body through the stimulation of certain reflex points usually located on the feet, though occasionally on the hands. Reflexologists, through this apparently simple foot massage, are able to help the body to heal itself by correcting any imbalances that can occur through illness, accident, disease or even lifestyle, correcting and maintaining the bodies natural equilibrium by restoring critical energy pathways that flow through the body, overcoming years of neglect and abuse. I perform Reflexology in Wolverhampton and Staffordshire, though there are many reputable therapists throughout the country.

It is a safe, natural and gentle therapy that can be used on anybody, including the elderly, the infirm and even babies.

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A Brief History of Reflexology

Whilst many people believe that Reflexology is a recent concept, its actual origins go back thousands of years. Similar techniques to those currently practiced were used in India, China, Africa and many other parts of the world. In an Egyptian tomb dating back to over 2000 BC, there are pictographs depicting reflexologists at work

Unfortunately the knowledge and experience of these ancient practitioners was for a long time forgotten by the Western world and may have remained so if not for the early work of Dr Alfons Cornelius in 1893. Convalescing himself, he experimented with massage techniques which became known as reflex massage.

In 1902 Dr William Fitzgerald realized the importance of massaging key areas of the body, forming what he called Zone Therapy. These ideas were then further developed by Eunice Ingham who concentrated almost completely upon the feet. It was her pupil, Doreen Bayly, that finally brought the practice into the UK in 1966, and since then it has flourished.

Today Reflexology is one of the foremost complementary health treatments and more people and organizations, including the NHS, are making ever greater use of reflexologists and their skills.

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Explore the AoR footmap

How does Reflexology work?

Whilst many people believe that Reflexology is a recent concept, its actual origins go back thousands of years. Similar techniques to those currently practiced were used in India, China, Africa and many other parts of the world. In an Egyptian tomb dating back to over 2000 BC, there are pictographs depicting reflexologists at work

Unfortunately the knowledge and experience of these ancient practitioners was for a long time forgotten by the Western world and may have remained so if not for the early work of Dr Alfons Cornelius in 1893. Convalescing himself, he experimented with massage techniques which became known as reflex massage.

In 1902 Dr William Fitzgerald realized the importance of massaging key areas of the body, forming what he called Zone Therapy. These ideas were then further developed by Eunice Ingham who concentrated almost completely upon the feet. It was her pupil, Doreen Bayly, that finally brought the practice into the UK in 1966, and since then it has flourished.

Today Reflexology is one of the foremost complementary health treatments and more people and organizations, including the NHS, are making ever greater use of reflexologists and their skills.

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What is Reflexology used for?

Reflexology has been used for the improvement of general health, though it has been found to be highly effective at relieving stress, fatigue, sleep disorders, digestive disorders, ear complaints, constipation, menstrual problems, high blood pressure, headaches and migraines, sinus problems, arthritis, allergies, back and neck pains, and some skin conditions.

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Are there any side effects to Reflexology?

As reflexology is not intrusive, there are very few side effects to treatment. Most people feel very relaxed or sleepy, though some are highly alert and refreshed. However, normally both types are fully refreshed the next day. A common side effect is an increased number of visits to the toilet, as the body is flushing out toxins. Some people may develop a few pimples.

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What a typical Reflexology Session entails

The first session is normally the longest and can last anything up to two hours. In that time, I'll ask you about yourself, your health history, lifestyle, diet, etc. From there I'll examine your bare feet and please - don't apologise! People are often very conscious about their feet and I assure you I've seen it all before. The most important thing is for you to simply relax.

As I begin, I'll feel the reflex points of your feet, feeling for what seems to me to be gritty particles under the skin. These are indications of blockages which I will massage away. You shouldn't feel any discomfort but if you do, let me know as this is important information.

After this initial examination, I'll be able to advise you how many more sessions you're likely to need. These will need to be spread over a period of weeks to enable the body to heal itself effectively, and each session will be around an hour in length.

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How much does it cost?

Costs can vary depending on time and location. Please contact me initially for a brief discussion and appropriate prices.

click here to pay in advance

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Frequently Asked Questions

Here is a list of some typical questions I'm frequently asked. Hopefully anything you might want to know is covered somewhere on this page. If it isn't, don't hesitate to contact me.

Does it tickle? 
Lots of people worry that they can't have reflexology because they're ticklish, but it isn't a problem. Light but firm pressure is applied to the feet and even ticklish people don't find it a problem. 

Does it hurt? 
There can be some discomfort during treatment, though this is minimal. 

I have a verruca. Can I still have treatment? 
Many people have corns, verrucas, calluses, bunions and all manner of ailments on their feet. To a reflexologist, these can be vital signs. However, it is important not to be afraid of them. They don't prevent you from receiving treatment. If a part of your foot is inaccessible for any reason, the hand is treated instead. 

Will you be able to tell if an area is tender if I fall asleep during the treatment?
The therapist is able to feel the grains or differences in the area so it is OK to take advantage of this relaxing moment.

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Reflexology Links

Lynne Hancher is a member of the Association Of Reflexologists

Reflexology Training Courses Wolverhampton & Staffordshire
Elaine Otrofanowei Essex Reflexologist
Reflexology in Cannock at O'listica

Reflexology in York with Corinne Brown
Reflexology with Anna-Louise Haigh's website the founder of Daoyin Tao

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